Mazatlan beaches are overwhelmed access was limited (VIDEO)

The beach capacity will be kept at 85 percent of its capacity in order to have the necessary space and distances between users. Six sections were closed today to reach the saturation limit.

This Saturday and Sunday access to the beaches that have reached the maximum number of bathers was restricted to avoid crowds and possible infections by Covid-19. For the closure, metal fences were used in the entrance areas and surveillance was set up with elements attached to the Ministry of Public Security and Municipal Traffic.

The first step to close today was that of Playa Norte; because at 12:00 hours, the capacity of 96 people was reached, a figure established as a limit for this section.

The entry to the beaches of Isla de Chivos, Pinitos and Pata Salada (space between Torre M and Monument to the Fisherman) was also prevented at 2:00 p.m., as reported through the Mztourist App platform, a digital tool used by Mazatlán City Council to publicize the capacity and the level of saturation.

This application includes a traffic light that indicates if the beach is still open, if it is close to closing or if it has already been closed.

Restringen acceso a playas de Mazatlán

The Luna Bonita beaches reached the limit of their capacity from 4:00 p.m., adding a total of five beaches in which no new income was admitted, which were monitored by elements of the Tourist Attention and Protection Center ( CAPTA), lifeguards and municipal police.

Restrict access to Mazatlán beaches
Aspect of the beach located at the Fisherman’s Monument at 3 pm on Sunday, July 12. Photo: Raquel Zapien / Son Playas.
Restrict access to Mazatlán beaches
North Beach aspect at 3 pm this Sunday. Photo: Raquel Zapien / Son Playas.

At 18:00 in the afternoon the passage to Pelícanos beach was denied and three more were close to closing, since many people wait for the intensity of the heat to decrease to go to these recreational spaces.

In total, six stretches of beach were closed this Sunday.

Mazatlán beaches are saturated
Metal fences were placed at the entrances to crowded beaches in Mazatlán as a gauging control mechanism. Photo: Son Playas.

Beach traffic light

The Mztourist App has 11 microsites, one of which is called “Safe Beaches”. Here is a map with 29 stretches of beach that change color according to the traffic light that measures the saturation level.

According to information from the Mazatlán City Council, the maximum capacity allowed is 85 percent of the total capacity of each beach. In this way it is intended to have the necessary space and distances between users, according to what is established in the health protocol.

The City Council appointed personnel for the face-to-face count of bathers in the different sections, information that is sent and updated every two hours on the platform.

This is the traffic light and what each of its colors indicate:

Appearance of the Safe Beaches microsite.

This has happened after the reopening

The boardwalk opened from June 23 and people packed this public space.

On July 1 the beaches were opened after being closed for three months. That same day the corresponding use and occupation protocol were published.

On the first day of the reopening of the beaches, 18 tons of waste was generated in the coastal strip, not including the garbage that was scattered in the sand.

July 8 was launched officially the Mztourist application, which is already available for iOS and Android operating systems. You can download it for free at this link.

That same week some stretches of beach were cut which are usually very crowded.

Starting Saturday, July 11, income was restricted based on the saturation light.

Malecon of Mazatlan
Tourists rest and protect themselves from the sun on the esplanade of Playa Norte. Photo: Raquel Zapien / Son Playas.
DATA
  • 6 beaches were still closed at 19:00 on Sunday due to the saturation of bathers.
  • 85% of the maximum capacity of the beaches will be the maximum income limit as a containment measure.

Source: sonplayas.com

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