From bus station to commercial tourist circuit and then Mercado de las Flores

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This market is one of the best-known establishments in the port because there locals and tourists find all kinds of bouquets and flower arrangements at an excellent prices.

MAZATLAN.- Who has not bought flowers at the Flower Market is not from Mazatlan. This market is one of the best-known establishments in the port because there locals and tourists find all kinds of bouquets and flower arrangements at an excellent price.  

And yes, it is one of the most popular sites, but do you know its history? To begin with, the Flower Market has a name and it is “María del Carmen Coppel de Ordaz”. 

According to Enrique Vega Ayala, official chronicler of the city, the site bears that name because originally the merchants sold their floral products in a flea market that was located in Plazuela Zaragoza, but these ended up being relocated at the beginning of the 90s. to the facilities that we all know today.  

Land that at the beginning of the 20th century was contemplated for the construction of a hotel that later became the first Central Bus Station of Mazatlan, in 1960. The chronicler said that years later, the municipal government sought to change “the changueras” to said facilities. , but these were refused so it was decided to relocate the flower vendors and that is how it became the flower market.  

The remodeling 

In an attempt to remodel the building, the governments of Fernando Pucheta and Quirino Ordaz Coppel thought of creating a tourist and commercial circuit; This consisted of three sections: a flower area, an area for shrimp vendors (las changeras) and a commercial area where they wanted to relocate the street vendors from the Glorieta Sánchez Taboada.  

The objective of the project was that in a single place all these lines of business would congregate and thus tourists and locals could have a place where they could find all the items they were looking for. 

What happened to the project? 

In the first triennium of Luis Guillermo Benítez Torres, remodeling was also sought, a project that was presumed to have an investment of 40 million pesos but was never executed. 

Currently, the enclosure has practically half of its abandoned premises, a very deteriorated façade, and obsolete wiring and drainage.  

Source: /punto.mx

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