San Cristóbal de Las Casas says: “We want water not coke”

The municipality of San Cristóbal de Las Casas asked the National Water Commission (Conagua) to revoke the concession to use water from the company “Inmobiliaria del Golfo S.A. de C.V. ”, company name used by the Coca-Cola Femsa bottling company in Chiapas.

In a letter, the city council announced that on March 26 the municipal trustee Miguel Ángel de Los Santos Cruz sent a petition to the head of the Conagua, Blanca Elena Jiménez Cisneros, to revoke the concession, arguing that the negative effects of extracting water from the subsoil put the supply at risk for the San Cristobal population.

Likewise, he highlighted the serious collateral damage related to the consumption of soft drinks, such as diabetes, obesity, hypertension, and caries, among others.

“The cancellation of the concession is requested in order to give priority to the needs of the San Cristobal population over commercial and industrial use since our municipality suffers from a shortage of water,” he said.

Regardless of the fact that there are no up-to-date and precise data on the use made of the vital liquid by the company, he stressed, they do have precision on the lack of water in the municipality, since more and more neighborhoods and neighborhoods do not have it.

He explained that currently San Cristóbal de Las Casas has an approximate population of 209 thousand 591 inhabitants, and the Municipal Drinking Water and Sewerage System (SAPAM) reports an approximate annual water consumption of 10 thousand 688 million 520 thousand liters each year.

He stated that SAPAM does not have enough water to provide the continuous and constant flow to households, receiving multiple complaints about the lack of availability and supply of water, which is why the urgent need to have sufficient and available quantity to meet its growing demand.

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Source: Proceso

The Mazatlan Post