Mazatlan cyclone and hurricane season are about to begin. Are you ready?

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One of the most intense seasons in the climate will begin on May 15 in the Pacific, and it is time that you begin to identify the different phases

In a few days, the cyclone and hurricane season will be activated in the Pacific.

This phase, which has been classified as one of the most intense in recent times, will come with intense activity with the development of 22 meteorological phenomena, forecast by the Secretary of the Navy.

All the Hurricane information for Mexico Pacific click here

Given this, it is important to take into account the dates, conditions and know how to identify each of the phases of these phenomena.

Start dates

  • May 15 in the Eastern Pacific Ocean.
  • June 1 in the Central Pacific,

The end of the cyclone and hurricane season will be November 30, 2020

In a projection of the season for the Pacific, two depressions, 11 tropical storms, five moderate hurricanes of categories 1 and 2 are anticipated; as well as four hurricanes with categories 2, 4 and 5

Evolution Stages

• Tropical disturbance:
zone of atmospheric instability associated with the existence of a low-pressure area, which favors the incipient generation of convergent winds whose eventual organization causes the development of a tropical depression.

• Tropical Depression:
Winds increase on the surface, due to the existence of a low-pressure zone. These winds reach a sustained speed less than or equal to 62 kilometers per hour.

• Tropical Storm:
The continuous increase in winds causes them to reach sustained speeds between 63 and 118 km / h. The clouds are distributed in a spiral shape. When the cyclone reaches this intensity it is assigned a name preset by the World Meteorological Organization.

• Hurricane:
It is a tropical cyclone in which the maximum sustained winds reach or exceed 119 km / h. The cloudy area covers an extension between 500 and 900 km in diameter, producing intense rains. The eye of the hurricane normally reaches a diameter that varies between 24 and 40 km, however, it can go up to about 100 km. At this stage, the cyclone is classified using the Saffir-Simpson scale, as indicated in the table.

It is a tropical cyclone in which the maximum sustained winds reach or exceed 119 km / h. The cloudy area covers an extension between 500 and 900 km in diameter, producing intense rains. The eye of the hurricane normally reaches a diameter that varies between 24 and 40 km, however, it can go up to about 100 km. At this stage, the cyclone is classified using the Saffir-Simpson scale, as indicated in the table.

How to prepare for hurricane season

Precautionary measures can temper the ravages of these destructive storms

During

Staying Safe During a Hurricane
  • Stay indoors.
  • Don’t walk on beaches, riverbanks or in flood waters.
  • Use flashlights in the dark if the power goes out. Do NOT use candles.
  • Continue listening to local area radio, NOAA radio or TV stations for the latest information and updates.
  • Avoid contact with floodwater. It may be contaminated with sewage or contain dangerous insects or animals.
  • Turn off the power and water mains if instructed to do so by local authorities.
Staying Safe Outdoors
  • Don’t walk, swim or drive through floodwater. Just six inches of fast-flowing water can knock you over and two feet will float a car.
  • If caught on a flooded road with rapidly rising waters, get out of the car quickly and move to higher ground.
  • Don’t walk on beaches or riverbanks.
  • Don’t allow children to play in or near floodwater.
  • Avoid contact with floodwater. It may be contaminated with sewage or contain dangerous insects or animals.
  • Stay out of areas subject to flooding. Underpasses, dips, low spots, canyons, washes, etc. can become filled with water.

After

After a Hurricane
  • Let friends and family know you’re safe – Register yourself as safe on the Safe and Well website
  • If evacuated, return only when authorities say it is safe to do so.
  • Continue listening to local news or a NOAA Weather Radio for updated information and instructions.
  • Stay alert for extended rainfall and subsequent flooding.

Source: smn.conagua.gob.mx

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