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Why “The Crucible” Should Be A Part Of A School Curriculum In Mexico

“The Crucible “is a phenomenally powerful teaching tool for Mexican schools because it is suitable for all ages. It can be used to teach younger children the importance of courage, independence, and integrity. It can also be used to teach teens about the Salem Witch Trials, how accusations can destroy lives, and what it means to stand up for oneself in the face of opposition.

Mexican schools must include “The Crucible” in their curriculum because it teaches them many things about life and society.

The Crucible

Literature, when taught with an interpretive approach, gives the student a sense of belonging to a culture and heritage. Literature is not just a linguistic exercise. It’s also an exploration of ideas and culture.

It doesn’t matter if students don’t enjoy reading. Reading for understanding becomes more interesting than reading for enjoyment when it’s done in the context of literature. 

Literature helps the student articulate their thoughts and feelings richer, which will help them grow as a person in the future. There are many reasons why well-written “The Crucible” essay examples are considered a classic help for students in high school. One of these reasons is that it shows the effect that the power of mass media can have on society and individuals. For example, in the 1950s, McCarthyism caused people to distrust one another because they thought they were Communists. In society today, social media has caused people to tear each other down and mostly just create hate. The book shows how media outlets can spread fear without any basis in reality.

The Crucible is a play about the Salem Witch Trials in Massachusetts during the 1690s. It is believed to have been written by Arthur Miller, who, at the time, was attending Columbia University as an undergraduate and was taking an undergraduate class on American Literature. In 1953, it won the Tony Award for Best Play.

“The Crucible” has often been referenced in literature as a symbol of social injustice or extreme intolerance of those who are different. This story has become a dominant part of American culture, and Miller’s words will continue to live on through these references.

The Crucible in School Curriculum

The word crucible means “a severe test or trial.” Schools in the past were not always a good place to learn, and many students left without any knowledge. They would repeat the cycle and end up in the same situation. Higher education was not affordable for everyone, so those who could not afford it were doomed to fail, but now the crucible has changed.

Many schools have reformed their curriculum with an eye toward rigor and relevance so that students are more academically challenged (giving them a better chance at succeeding after graduation) and socially engaged. Additionally, most colleges are now affordable for all students. These reforms have helped lower unemployment rates among high school graduates by encouraging more of them to go to college and pursue higher-paying careers.

The best way to translate the values of human society into the world of children is through literature. The books and stories represent how we want our world to be and how we want people to act, with all the challenges and failures that come in the process. The crucible is a great example of literature where people acted as they wanted others to act, rather than how they were expected or wanted to act.

Conclusion

The best way to translate the values of human society into the world of children is through literature. The books and stories represent how we want our world to be and how we want people to act, with all the challenges and failures that come in the process. The crucible is a great example of literature where people acted as they wanted others to act, rather than how they were expected or wanted to act.

Author’s Bio

Kathy Mercado

Kathy Mercado is an award-winning author of Contemporary Hispanic Fiction who never stops dreaming up new worlds to explore and new characters to introduce. She is a passionate advocate for libraries, literacy, and education.

The Mazatlan Post

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